An Introduction to Benchmarking: Part 3

In Part 1 and Part 2 of our benchmarking blog series, we introduced benchmarking and provided examples of key benchmark findings for staffing companies. Based on these findings, we identified specific problems for the companies to solve. This blog provides some hypothetical solutions stated below.

An Introduction to Benchmarking: Part 2

In Part 1 of this three-part blog series, we introduced benchmarking and chose four staffing companies from clients in the employment services industry to demonstrate the financial metrics that we used for benchmark analysis. In part 2, we will take a look at the key findings from this analysis.

An Introduction to Benchmarking: Part 1

"Benchmarking" is the process of measuring the products, services, processes, and financial performance of one company against those of similar companies that are known to be leaders in one or more aspects of their operations. Benchmarking provides necessary insights to help you understand your company’s position and performance within the industry and even across industries, and further helps you identify specific areas, systems, or processes in which your company can improve.

Saving Time on Accounts Payable

On a list of things you like to do, paying bills likely ranks somewhere near the bottom. Which is not surprising since it's time-consuming, prone to errors—especially if paper is involved—and fixing mistakes can be challenging at best. Not to mention the security and fraud concerns associated with sending checks in the mail.

Reporting Large Cash Business Transactions to the IRS: Everything You Need to Know

If your business receives large amounts of cash or cash equivalents, you may be required to report these transactions to the IRS.

Is an LLC the Right Choice for Your Small Business?

Perhaps you operate your small business as a sole proprietorship and want to form a limited liability company (LLC) to protect your assets. Or maybe you are launching a new business and want to know your options for setting it up. Here are the basics of operating as an LLC and why it might be appropriate for your business.

401(k) Plan Audits - Part 3: Limited Scope vs. Full Scope Audits

As we discussed in the first post in our 3-part 401(k) plan audit blog series, companies that have an employee benefit plan with 100 or more participants are required by ERISA (the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974) to have an annual audit by an independent public accountant. However, in many cases plan managers may choose to engage in a limited-scope audit instead of a full-scope audit. In this last post in our series on 401(k) audits, we’ll discuss the differences between limited scope and full scope audits, and how to tell which is right for your company.

It's Time to Build Your Tech Stack

Life as we know it is trending back towards normal, but the professional landscape is forever changed. Employers are allowing employees to permanently work from home, which will change their respective technology needs. Developing a suitable set of technology solutions—often called a “technology stack”—helps businesses streamline operations and empowers employees to work efficiently and effectively in multiple work environments. Below we outline common examples of various business processes and applications that can be integrated with your accounting products, to help you custom-build your own technology stack.

401k Plan Audits – Part 2: What Do Auditors Review?

When a business reaches a certain number of eligible participants for their 401(k) Plan, federal law requires an independent audit of the Plan. While larger companies may be familiar with this process, many small business owners may find themselves in uncharted territory the first time their number of eligible participants increases above the threshold amount. In this second blog in our 3-part series, we’ll discuss what auditors review during a 401(k) Plan audit.

2 Ways FASB’s New Lease Accounting Standard May Impact Banks

The Financial Accounting Standard Board (FASB) recently released a new lease accounting standard, which took effect for public firms on January 1, 2020, and will take effect for private firms on January 1, 2021.

The new lease accounting standard will require companies to record operating leases as both liabilities and assets on their balance sheets to give a more complete picture of a company’s financial obligations.